Niall’s virtual diary archives – Monday 10th December 2012

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Monday 10th December 2012: 5.37am. Link shared: http://www.google.com

Something very odd this past week since we moved into our new flat has been the appalling internet performance with our Rogers High Speed Cable Internet. Instead of the 36Mbit we're supposed to be getting, we were seeing about 2.5Mbit. Why? Well, a traceroute showed this:

C:\Documents and Settings\ned>tracert www.google.com

Tracing route to www.google.com [173.194.38.145] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1     2 ms     3 ms     3 ms  pfsense.nedland [192.168.2.1]
  2     *        *        *     Request timed out.
  3    27 ms    23 ms    19 ms  66.185.89.37
  4    32 ms    23 ms    24 ms  64.71.241.93
  5    19 ms    21 ms    21 ms  69.63.251.142
  6     *        *        *     Request timed out.
  7    26 ms    26 ms    17 ms  209.85.255.232
  8    33 ms    32 ms    30 ms  216.239.46.162
  9    41 ms    42 ms    44 ms  72.14.232.141
 10    70 ms    55 ms    63 ms  216.239.46.54
 11    79 ms    81 ms    85 ms  216.239.46.159
 12    97 ms   105 ms    99 ms  209.85.240.228
 13    96 ms    98 ms    86 ms  72.14.233.165
 14   177 ms   175 ms   172 ms  209.85.250.228
 15   239 ms   242 ms   237 ms  66.249.94.93
 16   250 ms   237 ms   239 ms  72.14.233.79
 17   237 ms   238 ms   239 ms  sin04s01-in-f17.1e100.net [173.194.38.145]

Trace complete.

Basically our packets are taking a trip to Europe, wander around for a while, and then get sent back to Canada. Not good!

So, what might be causing this then? Well, a factory reset of the Rogers SMCD3GN (I had had it in modem only bridge mode) finds the internet running at full speed with optimal routing with an IP in the 99.236.x.x range. When in bridge mode connected to my Proxmox virtualised pfsense routing firewall on its own NIC, it gets an IP in the 173.33.x.x range and the crappy speeds.

Anyway, cutting a long story short, yeah it turns out that Rogers pins the service they give you (i.e. the speed) to the MAC address of the entity which does the DHCP. If I had to take a guess, I'd bet they throttle speeds to the different cable modem based on their IP block, and that of course gets handed out by DHCP. And after?

C:\Documents and Settings\ned>tracert www.google.com

Tracing route to www.google.com [173.194.75.105] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1     3 ms     3 ms     3 ms  pfsense.nedland [192.168.2.1]
  2     *        *        *     Request timed out.
  3    17 ms    13 ms    17 ms  67.231.221.69
  4    28 ms    24 ms    23 ms  69.63.252.218
  5    45 ms    26 ms    16 ms  69.63.250.93
  6     *        *        *     Request timed out.
  7    17 ms    18 ms    16 ms  216.239.47.114
  8    34 ms    53 ms    34 ms  72.14.236.224
  9    60 ms    49 ms    52 ms  72.14.236.209
 10    65 ms    40 ms    48 ms  209.85.251.35
 11    41 ms    42 ms    54 ms  72.14.239.93
 12    52 ms    60 ms    51 ms  209.85.243.114
 13    49 ms    49 ms    49 ms  216.239.48.159
 14     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 15    50 ms    56 ms    52 ms  ve-in-f105.1e100.net [173.194.75.105]

Trace complete.

So there you go. Slow Rogers internet when you enabled bridge mode? Try faking the MAC address of your router to your Rogers modem!

#rogersinternet   #slow  

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Contact the webmaster: Niall Douglas @ webmaster2<at symbol>nedprod.com (Last updated: 2012-12-10 05:37:13 +0000 UTC)